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Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe

Attributed to: Jose Rafael Aragon (ca. 1783-90 Santa Fe, New Mexico - 1862 Pueblo Quemado (now Córdova), New Mexico)

Department: History
Date: c. 1835
Medium: gesso, pigment and leather
Dimensions:
18 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 3/4 in. (47 x 26.7 x 1.9 cm)
Classification: Painting
Credit Line: Albuquerque Museum, museum purchase, 1979 General Obligation Bonds.
Object number: PC1982.89.1
DescriptionFull-length image of the "Lady of Guadalupe" on a wooden retablo. An angel is below the main image. Flowers and other decorations surround the central image.
On view
Label Text:Much of the earliest Hispanic art in New Mexico was made for devotional purposes. The Arroyo Hondo Santero worked from about 1825-1850.

Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, a form of the Virgin Mary, is said to have appeared to Juan Diego, a peasant on the outskirts of Mexico City in 1531. She promised to help the people if the bishop would build a church dedicated to her. The bishop at first refused, but after a miracle in which the image of the Virgin appeared on Juan Diego's poncho [tilma], the shrine was built and dedicated. Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron of Indian and Hispanic people and is regarded as a protectress against illness, evil, and war.