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Happy Skies To You

Happy Skies To You

Artist: Fritz Scholder (1937 Breckenridge, Minnesota - 2005 Phoenix, Arizona)

Department: Art
Date: 1978
Medium: lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
Overall: 30 x 22 in. (76.2 x 55.9 cm)
Classification: Print
Credit Line: Albuquerque Museum, gift of Burton Horwitch
Object number: PC1980.182.2
DescriptionImage of a man facing the viewer. He wears a tan colored hat and a red shirt. Background is blue and red.
Not on view
Label Text:Fritz Scholder uses bold lines and colors to depict a warm and inviting cowboy figure. Distinctively figurative, Happy Skies to You takes the cowboy out of the context of a desert landscape and places him against a vivid backdrop fading from blue to red. Scholder was interested in the intense effects that could be achieved through different color combinations. In 1957 Scholder moved to Sacramento California where he studied with and was greatly influenced by Pop artist Wayne Thiebaud. After graduating with a Masters in Fine Arts from Sacramento State College, Scholder received a teaching position at the newly founded Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. He became well known for his portraits of Native Americans sometimes featured with props including American flags and beer cans, but he also created several series focusing on women, flowers, and mythic figures- the cowboy being one of the most notable of the figures in the west.
Text Entries

Fritz Scholder uses bold lines and colors to depict a warm and inviting cowboy figure. Distinctively figurative, Happy Skies to You takes the cowboy out of the context of a desert landscape and places him against a vivid backdrop fading from blue to red. Scholder was interested in the intense effects that could be achieved through different color combinations. In 1957 Scholder moved to Sacramento California where he studied with and was greatly influenced by Pop artist Wayne Thiebaud. After graduating with a Masters in Fine Arts from Sacramento State College, Scholder received a teaching position at the newly founded Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. He became well known for his portraits of Native Americans sometimes featured with props including American flags and beer cans, but he also created several series focusing on women, flowers, and mythic figures- the cowboy being one of the most notable of the figures in the west.